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Author Topic: New Anemometer Installation  (Read 51812 times)

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Offline aifan27

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #15 on: March 08, 2006, 10:15:34 PM »
Well, where I am mounting it is the apex of the roof (shaped like an A).

--Tim

Offline aifan27

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #16 on: March 08, 2006, 11:09:29 PM »
Any ideas?

Thanks.

--Tim

Offline niko

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #17 on: March 08, 2006, 11:16:39 PM »
In that case I think I would try to get it more than 3 feet above the apex. 

Offline aifan27

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #18 on: March 08, 2006, 11:26:27 PM »
So probably 5'+ above the apex?

Also, would 3-4' be enough support for a 10' pole?

Thanks.

--Tim

Offline niko

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #19 on: March 08, 2006, 11:42:02 PM »
I think 5' is a lot better than 3', really as much as you can get, but most of us just have to do the best we can. 3' to 4' support for a 10 footer with just an anemometer is OK, assuming the supports are solid, that's about what I have on mine.

Offline aifan27

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #20 on: March 08, 2006, 11:45:44 PM »
Thanks, niko.

To tell you the truth, I will be getting away with murder if the association even allows me to put a 5' pole up there.  If they let me do that, I will take it...I really don't want to push things.  I'm just about 100% sure that 3' above the peak of the roof is a better place then where it is now.

By the way, what is the big risk with putting the anemometer a 3' above the peak? 

Thanks.

--Tim

Offline weatheroz

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #21 on: March 09, 2006, 12:52:34 AM »

To tell you the truth, I will be getting away with murder if the association even allows me to put a 5' pole up there.  If they let me do that, I will take it...I really don't want to push things.  I'm just about 100% sure that 3' above the peak of the roof is a better place then where it is now.

By the way, what is the big risk with putting the anemometer a 3' above the peak? 


With all the crap you've had to go through with this, 1 metre above the roof is a great improvement over where you last had it.

So what do they do in regards to people who want to put up one of those antique looking wind vanes off their roof?  Taking in to account your anemometer would be a whole lot smaller than one of those antique ones, and possibly off the backyard side of the roof I can't see a problem.

In fact, get a photo of one of those antique looking ones, and ask them if you're allowed to have one of those up on the roof, and if so fire back at them the thing you really want up there is much smaller than the "1 metre tall wind vane in the photo".  :)

Offline JaxWeather

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #22 on: March 09, 2006, 12:55:10 AM »

By the way, what is the big risk with putting the anemometer a 3' above the peak? 


The roof will affect the wind, both speed and direction.  The closer to the roof the more the effect could potentially be.

-Bob

Offline niko

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #23 on: March 09, 2006, 01:00:13 AM »
...and bear in mind that it's very difficult for someone on the ground to accurately estimate the height of a thin pole above 2nd story roof  :wink:

Offline aifan27

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #24 on: March 09, 2006, 01:26:50 AM »
weatheroz,

No one in the neighborhood has has a wind vane, or anything on the roof...I'm telling you, the association is much more strict than you think.  As a matter of a fact, I just talked to someone today that I know personally and he's going to try and come over soon to check things out.  I should have a proposal soon.

Bob,

Thanks.  Although if I can only get it up about 3' above the roof, I will be satisfied.  Also, the radioshack mounting hardware (brackets) says it reccommends supporting 5' poles at max...Do you think the brackets would support a 10' mast as long as it has about 3'-4' of support?

Niko,

That's a very good point... :lol: :wink:

--Tim

Offline weatheroz

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #25 on: March 09, 2006, 07:38:55 AM »
weatheroz,

No one in the neighborhood has has a wind vane, or anything on the roof...I'm telling you, the association is much more strict than you think.  As a matter of a fact, I just talked to someone today that I know personally and he's going to try and come over soon to check things out.  I should have a proposal soon.


Perhaps a bit of subtle suggesting to your neighbours how wonderful their house would look with a classic wind vane on the front roof ???  ;)

Get one or two big clunker wind vanes up in your area, and it'll make life a whole lot easier to get your inconspicous anemometer up there, perhaps even a bit higher up? :)


Actually, whichever way you go, I'd start with as short as possible, i.e. 3 feet above the roof, and then over the next year or so extend it slowly up to 10 feet. ;) !!

Offline daveq

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #26 on: March 09, 2006, 07:54:13 AM »
Tim, if it is brackets that mount to the peak of a gable roof then I would not go with more than a 5' pole.  One bracket mounts at the top about 6" below the peak and the other is about 12" below that if I remember correctly. So you have actually only about a foot at the most of support.  This is the mount I have for mine and would not consider it adequate support for a 10 footer.  Just my opinion.

--Dave

Offline aifan27

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #27 on: March 09, 2006, 11:27:30 AM »
Very sneaky there oz... :wink:

Dave,

So then you basically have it clearing the roof by 4'?

Thanks,

--Tim

Offline administrator

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #28 on: March 09, 2006, 12:23:40 PM »
The length of the pole and the gap between the brackets depends on a number of things, but mainly...

1) What is the maximum wind speed you want to withstand? There's little point designing for a 150mph wind if your roof will rip off at 100mph!

2) How sturdy the brackets/fixings are.

3) What type of wall you're fixing to. A good solid brick will will support more than a wood/plastic cladded wall.

4) What type of bolts you use to fix the brackets to the wall.

5) What diameter pole you're using

Look at what radio hams do...I've had a 20ft vertical antenna mounted on an 8ft pole on brackets screwed to a wall. As long as you buy the right mounting brackets/equipment and mount the brackets properly, then you'll have no problems with a 10ft pole with the anemometer attached. In my case the pole was 2 inch thick walled aluminium and the brackets were very strong solid welded steel. I'd guess I had about a 2-3ft separation between the brackets, but it's a long time since I had that antenna.

By the way, then antenna eventually came down in a storm...the bracket and pole survived but the antenna mounting to the pole gave way leaving a mangled mess of bent aluminium :-(
Chris
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Offline niko

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Re: New Anemometer Installation
« Reply #29 on: March 09, 2006, 02:11:16 PM »
The length of the pole and the gap between the brackets depends on a number of things, but mainly...

1) What is the maximum wind speed you want to withstand? There's little point designing for a 150mph wind if your roof will rip off at 100mph!

2) How sturdy the brackets/fixings are.

3) What type of wall you're fixing to. A good solid brick will will support more than a wood/plastic cladded wall.

4) What type of bolts you use to fix the brackets to the wall.

5) What diameter pole you're using

Look at what radio hams do...I've had a 20ft vertical antenna mounted on an 8ft pole on brackets screwed to a wall. As long as you buy the right mounting brackets/equipment and mount the brackets properly, then you'll have no problems with a 10ft pole with the anemometer attached. In my case the pole was 2 inch thick walled aluminium and the brackets were very strong solid welded steel. I'd guess I had about a 2-3ft separation between the brackets, but it's a long time since I had that antenna.

By the way, then antenna eventually came down in a storm...the bracket and pole survived but the antenna mounting to the pole gave way leaving a mangled mess of bent aluminium :-(

I would add one thing to the list,

6) How much wind resistance does whatever is at the top of the pole have?

« Last Edit: March 09, 2006, 02:14:23 PM by nikoshepherd™ »

 

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