cloudy

Author Topic: Weather sayings and old wives tales  (Read 184849 times)

0 Members and 1 Guest are viewing this topic.

Offline administrator

  • Administrator
  • Posts: 10,644
  • Get answers to your questions - use Forum SEARCH!
  • Blackpool, UK
    • Weather-Watch.com
Weather sayings and old wives tales
« on: February 02, 2005, 09:37:26 PM »
We tend to concentrate on high-tech weather monitoring and forecasting techniques in here....because we all like computers! However, I'm sure there are many weather sayings or 'old wives tales' from around that world that might give us a more accurate forecast than all our high-tech attempts! I don't know what others think, but I'd find it interesting to hear some of the sayings that come from your area and I think this is the board to hold them in. I'll suggest that we use a new topic for each saying to allow people to comment on whether they have anything similar from their area and/or how accurate it appears to be.
Chris
Weather Forum Administrator

Offline krac2

  • Posts: 16
  • BLACKPOOL UNITED KINGDOM
    • lakeside fisheries and serendipity caravan site
Re: Weather sayings and old wives tales
« Reply #1 on: February 03, 2007, 04:10:08 PM »
not a weather saying but more an obsevation that I know to be true! on our canal system if the water begins to smell dank or fetid its going to rain within six hours, when  told this by an old timer many years ago i was a little sceptical but sure as eggs are eggs it works every time!                                                     krac2 :)
G7CAY

Offline krac2

  • Posts: 16
  • BLACKPOOL UNITED KINGDOM
    • lakeside fisheries and serendipity caravan site
Re: Weather sayings and old wives tales
« Reply #2 on: February 06, 2007, 02:20:32 PM »
The farmers interpretation of a barometer comes in a rhyme,   Long Fortold  Long to Last    Short Notice Soon Past       "the poor mans weather glass" is the Scartlet pimpernel! long ago countryfolk noticed (which has since been verified) that this little flower is sensitive to changes in the air ,opening when it is dry but closing when it accumulates moisture, presently to be discharged as rain.     And for those of us who live by the sea,    Seagull,Seagull sit on the sand,  its never fine weather when your on the land.             krac2 :lol:
G7CAY

Offline daveq

  • Posts: 3,098
  • Hollywood, MD
    • Hollywood - St. Mary's County, Maryland
Re: Weather sayings and old wives tales
« Reply #3 on: February 06, 2007, 03:12:38 PM »
Not sure if this an old wives tale.  When I worked for my uncle building houses he used water puddles to determine if we went home or kept working when it started to rain.  If bubbles formed in the puddles and floated for a little while we went home.  If no bubbles formed or they burst immediately we kept working as he said the rain would pass.  I can't remember now if it was accurate but that's how he decided.

--Dave
« Last Edit: February 07, 2007, 08:14:44 PM by daveq »

Offline Breitling

  • Luis
  • Posts: 1,192
  • NW Spain
    • Meteo Aerolugo
Re: Weather sayings and old wives tales
« Reply #4 on: February 07, 2007, 12:23:16 PM »
Heard when I was young to some countryside people: "If you want to know what the temperature is (ºF), just count the number of "cri-cri" of a cricket in a minute"

Never checked it....

Offline -bc-

  • Posts: 2
Re: Weather sayings and old wives tales
« Reply #5 on: June 23, 2007, 01:02:31 AM »
I couple of old wives tales that I've grown up with:

1, When the wind blows the tree leaves such that they turn over there is a storm aproaching

2, When the cows are laying down in the field it will likely rain.  I assume that if half the cows are laying down and half standing there is a 50% chance of rain BUT nobody has officially clearified this point for me. 

3, Of courses there is always the ring around the moon that predicts snow but that is more sicience than old wifes tale.


Offline -bc-

  • Posts: 2
Re: Weather sayings and old wives tales
« Reply #6 on: June 23, 2007, 01:05:20 AM »
*Hanging my head in shame* I race sailboats and I'm sure my crew would never forgive me if I didn't recite the good ol'

"Red sky in the morning, sailors take warning.
Red sky at night, sailors delight."


Offline gabba

  • Posts: 166
  • Paris (at the) Hilton
  • Lower Hutt, New Zealand
    • Maungaraki, Lower Hutt, NZ -  Weather
Re: Weather sayings and old wives tales
« Reply #7 on: June 23, 2007, 05:55:29 AM »
*Hanging my head in shame* I race sailboats and I'm sure my crew would never forgive me if I didn't recite the good ol'

"Red sky in the morning, sailors take warning.
Red sky at night, sailors delight."

Actually you stole my one. We have a slightly different version:
Red sky at night, shepherds delight
red sky in the morning shepherds warning

No doubt reflecting the "agriculture" background of our country :)

I read somewhere that this is actually true for us in NZ - since:
In the morning, the sun rises in the East, and the prevailing weather comes from the west, so if there is cloud about that the early morning sun reflects off, it is likely to move closer during the day.

In the evening the sun sets in the west. If the sun is reflecting off clouds, then they will be off towards the east, and likely to move further away overnight.



Offline dovesbear

  • Posts: 1
Re: Weather sayings and old wives tales
« Reply #8 on: August 13, 2007, 07:24:18 PM »
I 've seen this happen.
when the leaves on a tree curl or show the underside it is going to rain

Offline far_ken_beauty

  • Portland Bay Weather
  • Posts: 462
  • Portland, Victoria, Australia
    • Portland's weather
Re: Weather sayings and old wives tales
« Reply #9 on: August 15, 2007, 10:06:11 PM »
From a fishing mate...

"Mackerel scales, lower the sails."

Mackerel scales is referring to the look of the clouds, it is going to get windy.

Offline hjp

  • Posts: 3
  • North Devon, England
Re: Weather sayings and old wives tales
« Reply #10 on: November 17, 2007, 01:55:10 PM »
One I know that is more for long-range forecasting is that depending how high up rooks nest in trees shows how good a summer its going to be. The higher up, the better the weather will be!
I'm pretty sure the one about cows and rain has been shown to be a load of nonsense though!

Bashy

  • Guest
Re: Weather sayings and old wives tales
« Reply #11 on: November 17, 2007, 05:45:29 PM »
With regards to the cows, I believe it to be true as it keeps that patch of grass fry for them!

Heres another reason

Question:  Why do cows sit on the ground when it's about to rain?


Answer:
The only explanation I can think of is that cows know that the rain will
make the air cooler, and hence themselves cooler, and sit on the
ground to absorb it's heat.  They can also preserve their
own heat by laying on the ground, or standing in groups together
as horses do.
 wildman jackson
« Last Edit: November 17, 2007, 05:47:17 PM by Bashy »

Offline hjp

  • Posts: 3
  • North Devon, England
Re: Weather sayings and old wives tales
« Reply #12 on: November 18, 2007, 12:19:33 PM »
http://www.farmersalmanac.com/weather/a/is-it-true-that-cows-lie-down-when-its-about-to-rain

I think that for the amount of time that cows lie down during a day, the chances are that it will rain at some point when they are sat down. All coincidental i would say. Interestingly enough, it has been noted that cows and sheep do tend to face the same direction when it does rain.

Another old wives tale i remember is that if swifts and swallows are flying low at dusk before they go home to roost, its a sign of bad weather to come. The opposite is true if they're flying high. I think it has something to do with the flies they catch.

Offline astreas

  • Posts: 84
  • Davis VP2 wireless
  • Middle of Norway
    • Møllebakken værside
Re: Weather sayings and old wives tales
« Reply #13 on: December 28, 2007, 09:56:10 AM »
Came across this rather interesting topic and i've heard some of them before, in norwegian:
aften rød gir morgen sød - translated: evening red, the morning will be real fine. So this is a saying that is common, at least all over Europe.
But, here is another from my country:
when the rowantree has a lot of berries i the autumn there will be not much snow the following winter - and the opposite way, very much snow after an autumn with no rowanberries! Belive it or not, it seem to be truth...

Offline Kevint

  • Posts: 25
  • Missing the Sea Cliffs of my misspent youth
  • Catford - SE London - England
Re: Weather sayings and old wives tales
« Reply #14 on: December 31, 2007, 12:18:17 PM »
Red sky at night etc is the UK one we are all familiar with and works. IMHO!