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Author Topic: Do we still need weather forecasters?  (Read 2030 times)

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Offline niko

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Do we still need weather forecasters?
« on: June 06, 2016, 07:46:07 PM »
ars technica article about the evolution of forecasting.

Offline ALITTLEweird1

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Re: Do we still need weather forecasters?
« Reply #1 on: June 06, 2016, 11:41:21 PM »
Good article. I've been wondering the same thing for awhile now. But for some reason, I still watch the weather on the local news...lol
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Offline broadstairs

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Re: Do we still need weather forecasters?
« Reply #2 on: June 07, 2016, 07:04:25 AM »
I think that until we are able, at least here in the UK, to access timely data for programs such as WXSim sadly the answer is yes.

One issue which does exist at least with professional forecasts here from the likes of the BBC and UKMO is that there are far more general than people expect. On the BBC local news for the south east area covering mainly Kent Sussex and Surrey often says things like potential rain showers but with a caveat that not everyone will see one, so people organise their day expecting rain across all 3 counties but then never see one. My local area forecast using WXSim for the area about 10-20 miles around often turns out to be accurate when looking back after the event. A lot of folks just don't understand how general a forecast will be for the 3 counties. I suspect in places like the USA having so much more really local broadcasting the provided forecasts may be more specific to a smaller area.

Stuart

 

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